Talking on Stage (4 of 4): Ask the Right Questions

This has more to do with the content of what you’re going to say than anything. No matter how short or long you talk, be intentional with your words in every service:

*You’re not a cheerleader – sometimes you have to be, but mostly, let the cheers be a response to worship rather than trying to work people into a frenzy.
*Ask the right questions – without boring you with Kirpatrick’s levels of evaluations, let me just say there are two extremes: reaction and results. I’d rather the words I say have results than get reactions. Don’t use your questions to get yes/no answers from people. “Are you glad to be here today? YEAH!” It maybe appropriate once, but we tend to fall back on those kinds of questions over and over. I’d rather ask a question that stimulates results and pushes people to worship, like “So what makes you want to sing this morning.” Both questions have their place, just take some time to think about when you want to use which question.
*Communicate one message. If it’s possible, work towards the message that’s being brought that day. Most people only walk away from our 1.5 hr services with one to two points that they remember. Let the point they remember be the ONE message that the church leadership is communicating that day. Use your questions/talk to set up the pastor’s message.
*Practice your prayer just like you practice your mini-messages – it won’t make it any less sincere – I promise. God knew it when it was just in your head before it came out of your mouth anyway. 🙂

One final thought – own the moment. If you’re going to talk and you’ve been released to do so, be confident on the front of the stage. How you talk WILL set the atmosphere for the rest of the worship service.

mjd

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One thought on “Talking on Stage (4 of 4): Ask the Right Questions

  1. dorothy (vicar of vibe)

    I really, really agree with you about the ONE message.
    All our (creative fuZion) teams aim towards that focus. From the worship set to the stage design. It’s that important.

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